Weddings are surrounded by traditions. It can sometimes feel as if there would be no room to make your own decisions on your wedding day if you followed every tradition. However, this is unlikely. What is more likely is that you will decide which traditions matter most to you, and which you don’t think are all that important. A recent survey has discovered which wedding traditions are most and least important to people in the UK. It suggests that fewer people are really bothered about wedding traditions than you might realise.

Important Traditions

Some wedding customs are more important than others. The survey discovered that the most important tradition for many people (59%) was to have the bride’s father walk her down the aisle. Less than half of people who responded to the study answered that it was important for them to have a best man or bridesmaids (46%). A similar number of people were concerned with the groom seeing the bride in her wedding dress (42%) as were bothered if the couple both wore wedding rings (42%).

Less Important Traditions

While a few traditions remain important to the majority of people – getting married in a church (60%) – many are becoming largely unimportant to most people. Only 9% said that it was important that guests at the wedding received favours. A similar figure (10%) believed it was important that the bride’s family paid for the wedding. Even though some traditions remain popular to people, the reasons behind them may have changed. While many people marry in a church, only around half of them describe themselves as religious. The results also vary through the different regions of the UK. 80% of Glaswegians wanted the bride to walk down the aisle with their father, compared to only 44% in Sheffield.

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